Posts Tagged ‘tutorials’

11 Aug 2014
0

Bluemix iOS Push Notifications Tutorial: Part 2 – Minimum Requirements

In this post, I’m going to quickly highlight a few requirements before we officially get going with the Bluemix iOS Push Notification Tutorial Series.

1. Mac OSX and Xcode

For those out there new to iOS Development, you cannot test and deploy iOS Applications to devices unless you do it via an Apple Operating System. While you can follow this tutorial using Mountain Lion (OSX 10.8), I’ll be using and recommend Mavericks (OSX 10.9).

Then, you will need to download Xcode. Xcode is Apple’s IDE for developing Mac and iOS Applications. The latest release of Xcode is 5, which is required for this Tutorial as we’ll be deploying an iOS7 Mobile App to test Push Notifications.

Both Mavericks and Xcode 5 are free to download and are available via the Mac App Store. Simply launch the App Store App from your Apple Operating System and search for “mavericks” and “xcode“. You will need an Apple ID to connect to the App Store.

Screen Shot 2014-08-11 at 5.52.58 PMScreen Shot 2014-08-11 at 5.53.13 PM

2. Apple Device and iOS

Unfortunately, you cannot test Push Notifications on an iOS Simulator, which would’ve been awesome. So, you’ll need an Apple Device like an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch. I would recommend anything from an iPad 2 and up, or an iPhone 4 and up. This will allow us to deploy our app as an iOS7 Application.

So, as mentioned above, your Apple device will need to run iOS7. iOS7 is free from the App Store and definitely worth the upgrade if you haven’t done so yet. The reason I stress using iOS7 is because I haven’t had the opportunity to test the Bluemix SDKs on iOS6. I also don’t plan to as iOS8 is already around the corner.

3. Apple Developer Account

Screen Shot 2014-08-11 at 6.13.18 PM

This is sadly where some money comes in. You’ll need an Apple iOS Developer License, which goes for $99/year. Setting up the license is fairly straightforward, but could take a few days to be activated depending.

If you don’t have an Apple Developer Account as yet, but want one to follow with this tutorial series, I suggest you get it registered sooner rather than later. If we were only developing to test on an iOS Simulator, this wouldn’t be required, but because we need to test on an actual Apple Device, this is compulsory. You can either use your existing Apple ID or create a new one for the iOS Developer Account. It doesn’t matter really.

4. IBM Bluemix Account

bluemix

We’re almost done. What we’re going to need next is an IBM Bluemix account. This is free and is quick to set up. If you already have an existing IBM Id, then great for you. You can log into Bluemix with that ID and you’re good to go. Alternatively, click here to sign up.

Conclusion

With everything above set up and configured, we are ready to start developing iOS Applications, deploy them to Apple Devices and integrating them with the Bluemix Cloud.

The most difficult of all of this is setting up the iOS Developer Program. I did mine years ago and back then it required some documentation, phonecalls, etc. I’m not sure if it’s that complicated still.

In the next tutorial, I’ll be moving to video Media. I’ll be showing you step by step how to set up the necessary Apple Certificates which we’ll need for deploying to an Apple device and sending Push Notifications.

If you find yourself getting stuck with any of the above-mentioned, leave a comment and I’ll try to assist you.

Till next time :)
John
3 Aug 2014
0

IBM Bluemix iOS Push Notifications Tutorial: Part 1 – Overview

bluemix

This is a short video series that I’m planning for the very near future, on how to get the Bluemix Quickstart Push Sample Project running on your Apple devices.

Purpose of this Tutorial

While the Bluemix team do well to make these sample projects as easy to implement as possible and provide the supporting documentation and instructions, this process is quite daunting from my experience. My goal is to take you through the entire process from having very little already set up, to running the Sample Project and sending Push Notifications to your devices from the Bluemix Cloud.

Overview of Tutorial Series

The first phase of this Series will focus on iOS and will be mostly made up of short videos. Once i’ve properly tested the Sample Project for Android I will initiate the next phase.

This Series will be broken down into the following Chapters/Blog Posts:

  1. Minimum requirements for iOS Push Notification Sample Project
  2. Set up Push Notification Certificate and Provisioning Profile on Apple Dev Center (Video Tutorial)
  3. Set up and configure you IBM Bluemix Mobile Cloud Project (Video Tutorial)
  4. Set up and configure Apple Push Notification Certificate for your Mobile Cloud Project (Video Tutorial)
  5. Download and install Bluemix Quickstart Push Sample Project for iOS (Video Tutorial)
  6. Deploy and test Quickstart Push Sample Project as an iOS App on your device (Video Tutorial)

I’ll get the Chapter on minimum requirements out in the next few days and will take it from there.

Cheers for now.
John
15 Apr 2014
0

Install previous versions of iOS SDK in your current version of Xcode

In some cases, one might be developing for iOS6 and therefore require the iOS6.1 SDK. Xcode 5 however, no longer has the iOS6.1 SDK installed. In this article I’ll show you how to install the iOS6.1 SDK in your current version of Xcode.

Download Xcode 4.6.3 to get the iOS6.1 SDK and Simulator

  • Make sure Xcode is closed. If you are using Appcelerator Titanium, make sure that’s closed as well.
  • Go to Apple’s Developer Center
  • Log into iOS Dev Center (You will need an Apple Developer License for this)
  • Under Downloads, where it currently shows Xcode 5, Click on “Go to older versions of XCode
  • Let’s say you want the latest iOS6 SDK, that would be XCode 4.6.3. Search for it in the list and download the full Xcode package (about 1.6GB)

xcode463

Install the iOS6.1 SDK and Simulator

  • Once downloaded, double click on the “xxx.dmg” file.
  • Right click on Xcode.app and select “Show Package Contents
  • Navigate to “Contents\Developer\Platforms“.

- When in the Platforms folder, to copy over the iOS 6.1 SDK:

  • In “iPhoneOS.platform\Developer\SDKs”, copy the folder “iPhoneOS6.1.sdk”.
  • In your Finder Window, go to “Applications”.
  • Right click on Xcode.app and select “Show Package Contents”
  • Navigate to “Contents\Developer\Platforms\iPhoneOS.platform\Developer\SDKs”.
  • Paste the “iPhoneOS6.1.sdk” folder.

- When in the Platforms folder, to copy over the iOS 6.1 Simulator:

  • In “iPhoneSimulator.platform\Developer\SDKs”, copy the folder “iPhoneSimulator6.1.sdk”.
  • In your Finder Window, go to “Applications”.
  • Right click on Xcode.app and select “Show Package Contents”
  • Navigate to “Contents\Developer\Platforms\iPhoneSimulator.platform\Developer\SDKs”.
  • Paste the “iPhoneSimulator6.1.sdk” folder.

 Conclusion

That’s it. You can now use iOS6.1 SDK and Simulator as well as whatever current SDK and simulator you had installed.

Till next time, enjoy :)
John
30 Aug 2013
0

Appcelerator Mobile Dev – Ch 5 – Tab Groups

In this video tutorial, I discuss Appcelerator’s Tab Group control. I also show how to simulate a single Window Application and still make use of features that only a Tab Group or Navigation Group can provide out the box.

This tutorial forms part of my Blog Series called “Appcelerator Mobile Development – Season 1“.

Tab Groups are very important and can take your Mobile App into a new direction. While many are starting to make use of features like the  “Screen Break Menu”, which many apps including Facebook use, understanding the basics of managing multiple Windows in your mobile app is always important.

NOTE: I apologize for messing up my Android Demo. I shouldn’t have added the 3rd Tab as Android frowns on adding Tabs dynamically.

I would like to thank David Leedy for presenting this video as part of his NotesIn9 Video Series.

Please feel free to add comments, suggestions, etc.

Enjoy
John

 

26 Aug 2013
0

Appcelerator Mobile Dev – Ch 4 – Windows

In this video tutorial, I discuss Appcelerator’s Window control and how it’s used in one’s Mobile Application. I also discuss how to position child controls within the Window Control.

This tutorial forms part of my Blog Series called “Appcelerator Mobile Development – Season 1“.

While this is not one of the more exciting videos I plan on publishing, it’s definitely an important starting point to mobile development, because mobile apps running on Android or iOS are made up of Windows in the same way that Web Apps are made up of HTML Pages.

NOTE: I performed all my demos using the iOS Simulator, but the good news is that the very same code will work on Android.

I would like to thank David Leedy for presenting this video as part of his NotesIn9 Video Series.

Please feel free to add comments, suggestions, etc.

Enjoy
John